​Dupuytren’s Contracture or Dupuytren’s Disease or Palmar Fibromatosis

Description:

​Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s Contracture is the abnormal thickening of the tissue, just underneath the skin in the palm of the hand (in the connective tissue). It starts in the palm and can spread to the fingers.  Occasionally it can occur on the knuckles (Garrod’s pads), in the sole of the foot (ledderhose’s disease/plantar fibromatosis), and can even form in the penis (peyronie’s disease).

The first sign of Dupuytren’s Contracture is a small, hard lump (nodule) formed in the connective tissue of the palm. This can be typically 0.5cThe first sign of Dupuytren’s is a small, hard lump (nodule) formed in the connective tissue of the palm. This can be typically 0.5cm to 1cm. Firm nodules, progressing to cords (thick lines) and pits are representations of the features of dupuytren’s, and as the cords tighten they cause the pulling in of the fingers, which can eventually become permanent (contracture). The condition is not life threatening but can cause severe dysfunction to the hand in some cases.
​Dupuytren’s ContractureThe condition was named after French surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren in 1831, although it was discovered in the 1600s.

The first sign of Dupuytren’s Contracture is a small, hard lump (nodule) formed in the connective tissue of the palm. This can be typically 0.5cm to 1cm. Firm nodules, progressing to cords (thick lines) and pits are representations of the features of dupuytren’s, and as the cords tighten they cause the pulling in of the fingers, which can eventually become permanent (contracture). The condition is not life threatening but can cause severe dysfunction to the hand in some cases.
The condition was named after French surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren in 1831, although it was discovered in the 1600s.
to 1cm.

​Dupuytren’s Contracture

Firm nodules, progressing to cords (thick lines) and pits are representations of the features of dupuytren’s, and as the cords tighten they cause the pulling in of the fingers, which can eventually become permanent (contracture). The condition is not life threatening but can cause severe dysfunction to the hand in some cases.
The condition was named after French surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren in 1831, although it was discovered in the 1600s.

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